If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right. Switch to Accessible Site

WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

RSS Feed

Posted on 10-24-2012

first_aid_kit_200_300.jpgEvery car should have a well-stocked first aid kit so that you and your family can be prepared for common injuries and emergencies. It should be stored in a location in the car that is away from the reach of small children but is easily accessible if needed. Most sources recommend that the first aid kit be in its own container so that the contents are safe and don’t roll around. You can buy a prepared first aid kit or buy a common plastic toolbox and assemble your own.

Whether you buy a prepared first aid kit and supplement it with additional items or choose the do-it-yourself route, we hope you’ll find the recommendations below helpful. Our list has been compiled from sources such as the American Red Cross, the Mayo Clinic, and other organizations concerned with the safety of autos and the families who travel in them. That means you should probably consider each item a pretty strong common-sense candidate for inclusion in your own car's first aid kit:

Emergency Items

· A cellular phone, so you can summon the police or emergency services (many sources list this as the most important item you should have at all times)

· A list of emergency phone numbers, including your family doctor, local hospital, AAA or other emergency road service provider, and local poison control centers

· Medical history and consent forms for each member of the family

· Small waterproof flashlight, with extra batteries

· One blanket or space blanket

· Candles and matches

· Duct tape (you can fix almost anything with duct tape)

Basic Medical Necessities

· First Aid instruction manual

· Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)

· Adhesive cloth tape

· Rolled bandages in various sizes

· Sterile gauze pads in various sizes

· Triangular bandage

· Antibiotic ointment and antiseptic wipe packets

· Cotton balls and cotton-tipped swabs

· Soap or hand sanitizer

· Scissors and tweezers

· One non-glass, non-mercury oral thermometer

Medications

· Aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen

· Aloe vera gel (for burns and sunburn)

· Anti-diarrhea medication

· Calamine lotion (for poison ivy or other skin irritations)

· Over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream

· Over-the-counter oral antihistamines

· Personal non-expiring medications used by you or your family

· If you or your kids are allergic or asthmatic, drugs to treat an attack

Items for Children

· Children's aspirin or acetaminophen

· Disposable diapers if your kids need them

· Child-safe insect repellent and sunscreen

Items for Pets

· The pet's health records

· An extra leash

· A small plastic or folding bowl for water

There are no comments for this post. Please use the form below to post a comment.

Post Comment